• Recently, the Partnership for Vivax Elimination (PAVE) was formed to support malaria endemic countries in their quest to eliminate Plasmodium vivax (P. vivax). This partnership is critical because more than one-third of the world’s population is at risk of contracting P. vivax and it is the most common form of malaria outside of sub-Saharan Africa. Young children and pregnant women are impacted the most. P. vivax constitutes a major challenge in eliminating malaria because hypnozoites,
  • Written by Kerre A. Willsher, PhD The 39 countries that have eliminated Malaria cannot afford to become complacent (World Health Organization, 2021), and nor can anyone else. With continuous exposure to Malaria, people develop some immunity to it. However, when Malaria is eliminated, the population does not have exposure and begin to lose their immunity (World Health Organization, 2021). If there is a recurrence of Indigenous Malaria, the risk of severe or fatal illness greatly
  • Written by Kerre A. Willsher, PhD The World Health Organization published their updated Resolution on the elimination of Malaria on May 25th, 2021. The Resolution or reminder aims to rekindle the will to accelerate and succeed in equitably eliminating Malaria. The Resolution demonstrates that everyone’s contribution is required in this quest. We must collaborate, never give up, and the right time is always now!!! Rotarians Against Malaria has a major role. We can eliminate Malaria. The
  • Written by Kerre A. Willsher, PhD. Scientists have recently discovered that Malaria treatment and containment is even trickier that first thought because plasmodium can also be concealed in the spleen as well as the liver. The spleen has a vital role in immunity to disease, destruction of parasites and the filtration of  blood. The spleen and its location in the body (Bing Image) The discovery which was made in Papua Province, Indonesia, was reported in
  • Peter McPhee, a member of the Rotary Club of Mitcham (Victoria), and of District 9810 Rotarians Against Malaria Committee, plus other Rotarians, sold raffle tickets as part of a RAM fundraiser at the Whitehorse Market recently. The raffle coincided with the baton relay for the centenary of Rotary in Australia. The six Rotary Clubs in the City of Whitehorse combine to run the market on the second Sunday of each month. Income comes from the
  • What will it take to eradicate malaria? This article by González‑Silva & Rabinovich (2021) in Malaria Journal draws on the history of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) to highlight the insights into the eradication of a pathogen. The authors highlighted the ongoing need to be open and adapt to the changing bio and socio-political contexts over time on the journey to eradication. Some lessons for malaria from the Global Polio Era.pdfDownload
  • The Rotary Foundation’s first annual $2 million Programs of Scale grant supports a Rotarian-led effort to dramatically reduce malaria in Zambia. The Partners for a Malaria-Free Zambia program will add thousands of community health workers to the country’s health system to test for, diagnose, and treat malaria in more communities. Read about how members formed a successful partnership to increase their impact. How to apply for a Programs of Scale grant Is your club or district service
  • District 9510 is about to embark on a project to work towards the elimination of Malaria in the Solomon Islands.Globally, each year, more than 400,000 people die of malaria – a preventable and treatable disease. An estimated two thirds of deaths are among children under the age of five.  By the end of this calendar year D9510, working in collaboration with the Rotary Club of Honiara and the Solomon Islands National Malaria Control Programme, will
  • A recent video presentation by Prof Ivor Mueller, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research (WEHI), Melbourne, reveals progress in the fight to eliminate asymptomatic P. vivax. Thanks to RAM District Supervisor Shelley Gurney (D9810) for bringing the video to our attention. The presentation was useful as it takes our understanding one step further from what we learned from Prof Shanks at the 2020 Virtual Conference. Some key points: P. vivax is harder to
  • The WHO Guidelines for malaria bring together the Organization’s most up-to-date recommendations for malaria in one user-friendly and easy-to-navigate online platform. The first version of the Guidelines is a compilation of existing WHO recommendations on malaria and supersedes 2 previous WHO publications: the Guidelines for the treatment of malaria, third edition and the Guidelines for malaria vector control. Recommendations on malaria will continue to be reviewed and, where appropriate, updated based on the latest available